lost time
× unshinyunhappypeople:

sans titre by a {peachy} keen tangerine on Flickr.

unshinyunhappypeople:

sans titre by a {peachy} keen tangerine on Flickr.

× cybergata:

Oh goody, a new box for Maru to jump into, head first.

cybergata:

Oh goody, a new box for Maru to jump into, head first.

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× uisoo:

Chloe Lisa/クロエ 莉咲

uisoo:

Chloe Lisa/クロエ 莉咲

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Ahh, the migration of the rare golden retriever fish. What a rare and beautiful sight in nature.

Ahh, the migration of the rare golden retriever fish. What a rare and beautiful sight in nature.

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× maengho:

투톤 멜로 셔츠
26,000원

maengho:

투톤 멜로 셔츠

26,000원

× ryat-assassin:

Ain’t no party like a philosophy department party because a philosophy department party is full of bitter, facetious depressives.

ryat-assassin:

Ain’t no party like a philosophy department party because a philosophy department party is full of bitter, facetious depressives.

× arquerio:

iceland #19 by níls on Flickr.

arquerio:

iceland #19 by níls on Flickr.

× fuckyeahjapanandkorea:

* by ☁1Q91☁ 

fuckyeahjapanandkorea:

by ☁1Q91☁ 

× jtotheizzoe:

kateoplis:

Olafur Eiasson’s installation at MoMA, Your Waste of Time, consist of broken chunks of Iceland’s Vatnajökull, Europe’s largest glacier. The museum had to turn one of their main galleries into a walk-in freezer to able to display them. “According to PS1, the pieces of ice chosen for the project are about 800 years old. That sounds about right to Ted Scambos, lead scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Scambos speculates that the ice came from the ‘Little Ice Age,’ the period between the 16th and 19th centuries during which glaciers grew larger than they ever have since—and advanced quickly.
‘These glaciers bear testimony to our history-being suspended and frozen for thousands of years-and now they are melting away, as if our whole history is fading,’ said Eliasson.”

Wonderful art, sad message.

jtotheizzoe:

kateoplis:

Olafur Eiasson’s installation at MoMA, Your Waste of Time, consist of broken chunks of Iceland’s Vatnajökull, Europe’s largest glacier. The museum had to turn one of their main galleries into a walk-in freezer to able to display them. “According to PS1, the pieces of ice chosen for the project are about 800 years old. That sounds about right to Ted Scambos, lead scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Scambos speculates that the ice came from the ‘Little Ice Age,’ the period between the 16th and 19th centuries during which glaciers grew larger than they ever have since—and advanced quickly.

‘These glaciers bear testimony to our history-being suspended and frozen for thousands of years-and now they are melting away, as if our whole history is fading,’ said Eliasson.”

Wonderful art, sad message.

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